About "Lighthouse"

 

FOR PHOTOS FROM THE 2010 PRODUCTION, CLICK HERE

Suggested by Henrik Ibsen's "The Lady from the Sea," transported to the windswept coast of 19th Century New England. Shipwreck! Leda, the lighthouse keeper’s daughter, rescues a sailor from drowning – or does she?  Who is this mysterious Stranger no one else appears to have seen? Can Leda summon the strength to resist his dangerous possession of her mind and soul? A spellbinding musical tale of passion, loss and survival overflowing with melody, humor and  humanity.

"Lighthouse" is the ultimate Romantic Musical Adventure.  Suggested by Henrik Ibsen’s “The Lady from the Sea,” this musical play moves the action from Ibsen’s fjord country in Norway to the rocky coast of New England, so the story will have greater resonance for an American audience.  The time is the late 1870’s, the last generation in which lighthouse keepers are folk heroes -- “Quiet and still at his desk/The Lonely Light-Keeper/Holds his vigil” -- soon to be replaced from coast to coast by the Edison lamp.  A time of odd, unsettling calm as the country recovers from the Civil War, counts its losses, and gathers its resources to face the onslaught of the new era -- a restless society in transition, uncertain of its values -- not at all unlike today.

“Lighthouse” is a musical play.  It isn’t an opera, but a good deal of it is sung.  It isn’t a musical comedy, but it builds on the tradition developed so brilliantly by the great musical dramatists from Rodgers and Hammerstein and Lerner and Lowe through Stephen Sondheim and beyond.  The music is melodically adventurous and the song styles varied.  All the songs tell the story, develop the characters, and also paint the picture of a community at a threshold, when the old certainties are crumbling.  But it’s not at all solemn -- there is a great deal of spirited fun in it, engaging offbeat characters, and most of all -- life.  The production of “Lighthouse” we did fifteen years ago had 27 characters, this has 15.  But that’s not the only reason it’s a very different play.  We have revised, rethought and reimagined virtually every aspect of the original, so that while it is in some sense a revival, the truth is it’s a totally new work. 

SPOILER ALERT - IF YOU WANT THE COMPLETE PLOT OF LIGHTHOUSE, CLICK HERE

HOME